“These are among the happiest patients in my practice. They are appreciative of the almost immediate resolution of pain and numbness at night, and the fast ability to return to work and activities of daily living.”

– Dr. Marko Bodor

Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common of all nerve entrapments and has a prevalence of 5%, affecting one out of twenty people around the world. When work activity modification and a trial of therapy, splints and injections fail, carpal tunnel release surgery is an option.

Carpal tunnel release has been performed via open surgery since the first half of the 20th century.  Since the 1990s, the procedure could be done arthroscopically, with placement of a camera inside the wrist to guide the operation and minimize the incision. In the last decade, techniques have been developed with the “camera” on the outside, making the incision even smaller and speeding up recovery.

Dr. Bodor has been doing ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel releases since 2013, helping develop a technique using  the Manos device invented by Napa Medical Research Foundation board member Dr. Fletcher Eyster.  Colleagues at Mayo Clinic took notice and developed a new device, the Sonex. Dr. Bodor was the third person to use Sonex in February 2017. As of April 2019 has completed over 50 cases with the device.

Dr. Bodor explained, “We’ve been closely following our patient outcomes and have a 100% follow-up rate at one year. Our outcomes exceed published outcomes for mini-open release procedure in terms of speed of resolution of symptoms, return of function and final outcome.”

Overall satisfaction with the procedure has been very high. “The procedure is so good that follow-up can be via text message with an image of the wound on post-operative day three,” said Dr. Bodor. “Patients have minimal, if any, pillar pain and do not need hand therapy afterwards.”

According to Dr. Bodor, “These are among the happiest patients in my practice. They are appreciative of the almost immediate resolution of pain and numbness at night, and the fast ability to return to work and activities of daily living.”

“In addition to assessments of each patient’s pain and function at one year following surgery, thanks to a generous donation to the Napa Medical Research Foundation by Ms. Dorian Davis, we are able to do formal nerve conduction studies and electromyography to assess return of nerve function, which will be a first for this procedure.”

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